Health

Cannabis legalised in the UK and available on the NHS

By George Rushworth on November 9th, 2018 / Views

Specialized doctors can prescribe the drug on the NHS as of the first of November 2018.

Consultant medical practitioners can now prescribe cannabis products available to people suffering from conditions like multiple sclerosis, cancer, and children with severe epilepsy where other forms of medication have failed. GP’s as it stands do not have the power to write these prescriptions but can refer their patients to specialists who can.

In what form will the cannabis be prescribed?

The medication is likely to include oils, pills, and capsules but won’t come in the form of smoking cannabis. The medications contain the compounds of THC which gets you high and CBD which calms and relaxes the body. Individual hospitals will decide which forms they use and how they will fund the treatment.

Is this the first signs of legalizing cannabis for all?

The government has made it clear that this is not the case. Home Secretary Sajid Javid has said: “There will be strict controls in place and this is in no way a step towards legalizing the recreational use of cannabis.” The liberal democrats and the green party, on the other hand, have been for the legalization of cannabis in the UK, money earned from the taxes on cannabis alone would bring in an estimated £3.5 billion.

So how safe is cannabis?

The effects of cannabis vary from person to person, some people feel relaxed and happy others get the giggles and munchies but some people who have used cannabis feel faint and sick or confused and anxious. Research shows 10% of people who use cannabis regularly become dependant on it. The risk of becoming addicted becomes higher if you start using cannabis as a child. If you stop using cannabis, like with other drugs you are likely to experience withdrawal symptoms.

Mental Health and cannabis.

Regularly using cannabis is likely to increase your risk of developing a psychotic illness. It can also increase the risk of relapse in people who already have schizophrenia, and can make psychotic symptoms worse.

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